Whats News?

 

Learn the latest in CPR, AED, First Aid and other emergency care.

 

New CPR Guidelines

Compression Only CPR

New First Aid Guidelines

 


New CPR Guidelines

 

Are you up on the latest guidelines for CPR and AED use? The 2010 guidelines (that's right, 2010!) are official as of the spring of 2011. There are a few changes for both Lay and Professional CPR. And because of these changes, you are supposed to take a full class, not just a 'recert'.

 

The major changes are:

 

ABC is now CAB: It used to be Airway, then Breathing, then Circulation/Compresssions. Now we concentrate more on starting Compressions before Airway and Breathing. There are differences on how we determine if someone needs CPR, so make sure you update your current certification by taking a class.

 

• Lay persons no longer provide 5 sets of 30 compressions/2 breaths. For this level of training, you just continue doing 30 to 2 without a reassessment of the patient.

 

• AEDs can now be used on Adult, Child and Infant!

 

If you're unsure if you have the latest certification, contact a qualified instructor today!

 

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Compression Only CPR

 

With the latest in marketing from some major players in CPR and First Aid training, a rumor has started even among professional medical personnel that the new guidelines teaches Compression Only CPR. This is not correct.

 

Compression Only CPR is something that can be provided by instructors as an 'awareness' or an 'alternative' if someome is not comfortable doing the mouth-to-mouth part of CPR. But, the bigger story is that 911 dispatchers can now instruct callers that CPR can be performed by doing compression only. This, we hope, we get more bystanders involved by doing CPR since they don't have to worry about placing their mouth on the victim's.

 

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New First Aid Guidelines

 

There are new guidelines in First Aid. Some are:

 

• Shock: you no longer raise the feet 6-12" off the ground for possible stroke victims. Keep them warm as before and contact medial help.

 

• Nose Bleed: you are now being instructed to lean forward and 'pinch' the nose. But if the nosebleed lasts longer than 10-15 minutes, you should contact medical help.

 

If you're unsure if you have the latest certification, contact a qualified instructor today!

 

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